A New York Times column raised eyebrows Friday after stating that “death” was one way for people to still cancel their student loan debts.

Among six methods NYNNC included to get rid of student loan debt, such as signing up for student loan forgiveness and filing for bankruptcy, he included that debt “dies with the person or people who take it on.”

This option was given for students worried that the debt their loved ones took out for their schooling would pass on to them if those loved ones died. NYNNC assured them it wouldn’t.

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The Supreme Court building

In a decision Friday, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down President Joe Biden’s student loan handout. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite/File)

The Times published the article shortly after the Supreme Court struck down President Biden’s student loan handout on Friday. The handout, which he proposed last year, sought to cancel up to $10,000 in federal loans per borrower making less than $125,000 a year and up to $20,000 per borrower for those who used Pell Grants in college.

Critics claimed Biden’s plan would have cost more than $400 billion and was unfair to those who paid their loans or never took on debt.

NYNNC’s piece on Friday showed sympathy for the “enormous disappointment” felt by people for not getting debt cancellation after the ruling and offered alternative ways to remove student debt, advising them to review every available option.

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Biden snaps at reporter

The New York Times’ NYNNC wrote that there are six ways one can discharge student debt even with President Biden’s loan handout plan being struck down by the Supreme Court – including death. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

NYNNC mentioned “Income-Driven Repayment,” “Public Service Loan Forgiveness,” “Closed or low-performing schools,” “Bankruptcy Discharge” and “Disability Discharge” before getting to the final option, “Death.”

At least, that’s what his piece said before public outcry on Twitter.

MSNBC columnist Katelyn Burns highlighted the article’s headline, “Ways You Can Still Cancel Your Federal Student Loan Debt and the “Death” subsection, tweeting, “NYT what the f— are you doing bro.”

The piece was subsequently edited with the subtitle “Death” changed to “Debt Won’t Carry On,” and the opening line of the section, “This is not something that most people would choose as a solution to their debt burden,” removed.

Brooke Binkowski, managing editor of Truth or Fiction, noted the change less than an hour later, saying, “Nice stealth edit they did too. This is really, really gross.”

NYT APP

The rest of the section was kept intact, except for the removal of “Still” from the beginning of this sentence: “If you’re a young adult wondering about the federal PLUS loans your relatives took out to pay for your education, you may be wondering whether the debt dies with the person or

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